Philosophical Symbolism of Indigenous Weaves in Ghana

Authors

  • Benjamin Eghan Department of Industrial Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi-Ghana
  • Charles Frimpong Department of Industrial Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi-Ghana
  • Benjamin Kwablah Asinyo Department of Industrial Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi-Ghana
  • Raphael Kanyire Seidu Department of Industrial Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi-Ghana

Keywords:

philosophy, symbolism, indigenous weaves, traditional craft

Abstract

Africans love fabric; it is either adorned for its beauty or symbolic and metaphoric import. Recent
observation reveals a new trend of strip woven fabrics made by young weavers who are not wellversed in the history and philosophies of their communities. Consequently, most of the contemporary
weaves lack the communicative value that these indigenous fabrics once had. This study therefore
seeks to investigate the history and philosophical symbolism of weaves produced in selected
dominant weaving communities in Ghana viz., Bonwire, Agotime – Kpetoe, Daboya, Agbozume,
Nyole and Wa. Narrative research was used to describe the lives and encounters of the people, and
also gather stories about the various weaving communities visited. It has been established that
symbolism does not only rest in the weaves but also in how they are worn on the body. The study
revealed among others that little attention has been paid to the philosophical basis of the structure
and colour of weaves in the 21st century and recommends therefore that young weavers be
encouraged through organized workshops to study the craft with its history, symbolism, and
philosophies.

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Published

2021-09-30

How to Cite

Eghan, B. ., Frimpong, . C. ., Asinyo, B. K. ., & Seidu, R. . K. . (2021). Philosophical Symbolism of Indigenous Weaves in Ghana. ADRRI Journal of Arts and Social Sciences, 18(2 (6) July-September), 1-22. Retrieved from https://journals.adrri.org/index.php/adrrijass/article/view/700